Pages Navigation Menu

DEP TO HONOR NEW JERSEY RECYCLING LEADERS

DEP TO HONOR NEW JERSEY RECYCLING LEADERS

TRENTON – While the global recycling community continues to face challenges due to global recycling markets and rising program costs, New Jersey’s recycling leaders are pursuing innovative techniques and strategies to further reduce the waste stream. Among the 2020 honorees of the DEP’s annual recycling awards are a business that recycles food waste from its cafeterias and plastics from its laboratories; a municipality that recycles 75 percent of its waste, including polystyrene; a university with a comprehensive recycling and reuse program; and an 11 year-old boy who started a successful battery recycling program.

The Department of Environmental Protection will recognize Merck & Co., Inc. in Kenilworth, Union County, Middletown Township in Monmouth County, Princeton University in Princeton, Mercer County, and Sri Nihal Tammana of Edison, Middlesex County among 10 businesses, organizations and individuals during a Thursday, Nov. 19 virtual awards ceremony being held in conjunction with an Association of New Jersey Recyclers educational webinar. Register for the webinar and ceremony at  www.anjr.com.  “I commend the award winners for their innovative efforts to promote recycling and educate their communities about the importance of diverting waste,” DEP Commissioner Catherine R. McCabe said. “New Jersey has been a national leader in recycling for many years, thanks in part to the types of initiatives we see from our recycling award winners and those who follow their excellent examples. Their work helps protect our environment by keeping communities clean and reducing the impacts of climate change.” “We proudly recognize these award winners for their diligent work to keep New Jersey’s environment clean and healthy,” said Paul Baldauf, Assistant Commissioner for Air Quality, Energy and Sustainability. “Every year our winners show us the value of recycling and its importance to the environment. We hope promoting their accomplishments will inspire others to adopt better recycling practices.” 

In 1987, New Jersey became the first state to enact legislation that requires recycling in residential, commercial and institutional settings. New Jersey achieved an overall recycling rate of 60 percent in 2017. The DEP administers a number of grant and educational programs to help improve the statewide recycling rate.      The DEP urges all residents to participate in their local recycling program and do their part to keep unacceptable materials, such as plastic bags, trash, propane tanks and used syringes, out of curbside and workplace recycling bins.